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Parcells still old school

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Ex-Cowboy Dan Campbell gives us a brief glimpse into Parcells World. In an article about his new team - the Lions - and new head coach - Rod Marinelli - Campbell discusses the contrast with Bill Parcells and the Cowboys.

"Bill's not a huge believer in OTA's, so even his first year in Dallas we really didn't do that," Campbell said. "He was big into running, lifting, those things. You were required to be there for about a threemonth period in the offseason, and if you weren't there it wasn't a good moment for you."

[snip]

"Every team in the league talks about toughness," Campbell said. "It's just a given that you've got to be a tough team. But in Dallas, the way we were going to beat people was to line up and physically just try to beat the crap out of them."

"Here, we want to do that, but we're talking more about beating people with conditioning - you get into your huddle, get out of your huddle, run your play. Defense, same way. It's running and running and running full-speed. Constantly they're saying, `You're going to be in better shape than you've ever been in. You're going to push yourself harder than you thought you ever could be pushed.' "


Parcells just wants to beat the crap out of his opponents. Old school.

JJT has some new stuff up on the Cowboys over at The Sporting News. He talks about Jacque Reeves and the Jason Ferguson back-up crew, Montavious Stanley and Thomas Johnson. What? No mention of BTB favorite Sammy T. Oh well.

He also discusses Al Singleton.

SCOUTING REPORT: Veteran OLB Al Singleton will compete for playing time with rookie OLB Bobby Carpenter at strongside linebacker. Carpenter should win the job, but the Cowboys want Singleton on the roster because he makes few mental mistakes and is a quality locker room presence. He weighed about 228 when Dallas signed him as a free agent three years ago, but now he's closer to 245, which allows him to be much more effective in the Cowboys 3-4 scheme because he doesn't get swallowed up by tackles and tight ends. He has good speed and is a solid tackler -- the kind of player every championship-caliber team needs.