clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Dallas Cowboys' DeMarco Murray: "I'm Great" After Surgery For Broken Bone In Hand

New, comments

The oft-injured Dallas running back has made it through 14 games without missing time this season; but now there are questions about his opportunity to stretch that to 15. DeMarco is sparing no effort to prove doubters wrong.

Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports

Late last night, Tom Ryle and I hosted an impromptu edition of Ask BTB Live on Twitter, and one of the first topics that came up revolved around DeMarco Murray's broken hand, and how the club was going to respond to the issue. That's understandable since it seems that every news story about the club has centered on the same issue. Last night we did not have anything more than speculation to go on, and still there are no solid answers, but Murray is poised to give it a go on Sunday.

The NFL's top rusher answered questions about his injury directly and stated that there was no post-surgical pain.

"I'm good. I'm great." - DeMarco Murray

A man of few words today; yet they were ones that Dallas Cowboys fans were glad to hear. Murray did go on to confirm that he will reach out to Emmitt Smith, who suffered a similar injury during his illustrious career as the Cowboys running back, for some advice on how to best manage the situation.

One thing that is known for certain is that the Dallas trainers and equipment gurus held a meeting Tuesday morning to search for answers to how they were going to help protect #29's hand in the event that he does answer the bell against the Indianapolis Colts this weekend. While DMM was not at the meeting, several ideas were considered for him to experiment with over the next few days.

There is precedent for backs to return to action shortly after this type of injury. In addition to Smith, who missed one game following his 1999 hand surgery, current Green Bay RB Eddie Lacy experienced a similar fracture during his time at Alabama. Lacy played two games following the injury and then underwent his repair procedure. In those games he carried the ball 38 times for over 300 yards against two of the top teams in the SEC.

It is possible, perhaps even likely, that we will see DeMarco Murray take the field at AT&T Stadium this weekend. The biggest questions will be how well the team doctors can manage the pain, how well the equipment staff can protect the injury, and will the protection they devise hinder or limit Murray's ability to handle the ball. Only time will give us those answers.