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The Extremely High Cost Of Attending The Super Bowl

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This weekend over 80,000 fans will file into University of Phoenix Stadium to watch the Patriots and Seahawks square off in Super Bowl XLIX. Most of us will never have the opportunity to experience a Super Bowl first hand, but the thought got me to thinking what it would take to attend the big game.

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

The first thing you need to get a ticket to the Super Bowl is a thick wallet. The average cost of a single ticket for Sunday's game is $4,833.25. I don't know about any of you, but here at the Macelli household that is not the kind of cash that we normally keep around in case we get the urge to go out and do something. Remember, too, that for that five grand you are only getting a single ticket. Not included are things like travel expenses, accommodations, and the all important souvenirs. For that price you don't even get to eat. Still that is just the average price for a ticket. You could always choose the nosebleed seats and get by with only spending $2,395.00.

To put the cost of that single seat at the Super Bowl into perspective, the average Dallas resident would have to work 286 hours to cover the average ticket price. That works out to just over seven weeks to cover the cost. For the same price she could attend a total of 13 home games at AT&T Stadium. That is almost two years worth of Cowboys football for the same price as you would have to pay to watch the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks. Given the choice, I know which decision I would make. Perhaps if the 'Boys were in the big game I would feel differently.

Still, for many die hard fans, getting to see the Super Bowl in person is on their bucket list. I know it is for me. Depending on the fan's choice of favorite teams, the folks at TiqIQ and NerdWallet have provided us a list of how many times that fan could watch her favorite team at their own stadium for the price of a Super Bowl ticket.

There is another option to help fans save some money on the cost of admission. If you are willing to wait until the day of the game, the average cost of a seat has historically dropped by $921.00. With that option you are taking the risk of not getting a seat at all, but if you are willing to take a gamble, you can see the game at a savings of over 20%. On the other hand, you can join me and 100 million other Americans on the couch and enjoy the game the old fashioned way, complete with commercials, for a lot less.

I am going to take a wild guess and say that you will be choosing the last option.