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Cowboys Mock Draft V 2.0: No Trades, But With Compensatory Picks

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It's that time again for our second Mockery of the season. This time, we're going to operate without trades but bring on the compensatory picks.

Chuck Cook-USA TODAY Sports

Welcome, BTB Faithful to another Mockery in which we look ahead to the 2016 NFL Draft. In Mockery I, we decided to shoot for the stars with a trade back to gather more selections in the second and third rounds. Today, we're just going shoot straight from the hip with a standard mock, but don't forget those lovely compensatory picks.

As my colleague, OCC wrote many moons ago, the Dallas Cowboys will likely get an extra fourth-round pick and three additional sixth rounders. You can read more about that here. Now, without further ado, let's get to making a mockery of the 2016 NFL Draft. The Dallas Cowboys are on the clock...

Round 1 (4th overall): Myles Jack, LB, UCLA, (CBS rank: 5th overall)

Analysis: With Jalen Ramsey gone to San Diego, the Cowboys look to find a difference maker. The Cowboys have question marks at linebacker and really need to look to the fill a playmaking role on their defense. When a Rod Marinelli defense is at its best is when the linebackers are making plays. For what Jack may lack in ideal size, he makes up for with tremendous effort to get off his blocks and bring down the ball carrier. He's also a well-rounded coverage player that can run with receivers and tight ends.

His ability to diagnose the play and read the quarterback's eyes make him the proper selection at four. He's a dynamic athlete with skills that are off the charts. UCLA has become a Linebacker University of sorts with Eric Kendricks, Anthony Barr, and Akeem Ayers all making their names in the NFL. Jack gives the Cowboys what they sorely need, somebody on defense that excites with a masterful knowledge of the game and skills to boot.

Jack is a plug-and-play guy and is sure to be successful wherever they want him to be. Did we mention that he's also had a turn or two at running back?

Round 2 (34th): Kendall Fuller, CB, Virgina Tech, (CBS rank: 45)

Analysis: The Cowboys have so many questions surrounding the contract of Brandon Carr and the impending free agency for Morris Claiborne, and with a deep defensive tackle class, the Cowboys decide to go cornerback here and make sure they get one with some skill.

Fuller comes from a bloodline that has produced some good corners at the NFL level. Kendall is the youngest of the Fuller family, but it's clear he's the one with the highest ceiling and most gifted athletically speaking. He's got good size and the frame that is NFL ready. While he's not as polished as his brother Kyle, don't expect for it to take very long for him to get up to speed. Fuller has the natural acceleration and ball skills to disrupt receivers while staying in position to make plays.

Round 3 (67th): Adolphus Washington, DT, Ohio State, (CBS rank: 57)

Analysis: Washington has the talent of a second-round player in this draft, but is a bit undeveloped, which leads to the Austin Johnson's and Vernon Butler's of the world jumping him in draft status. However, at the beginning of the third round, this one is a no-brainer. Who better to take Washington's natural athletic talents and help him reach his potential than Marinelli?

Washington is a long and limber defender for his size. He knows how to disrupt the pocket from either tackle position. He's got a good burst off the ball but needs to work on converting that with power through the point of attack. Washington is as skilled a defensive tackle as they come, but could use a really good position coach to realize that and create the finished product.

Round 4 (102): Jordan Howard, RB, Indiana, (CBS rank: 83rd)

Analysis: The Cowboys have a healthy Darren McFadden, who rushed for 1,000+ yards in 2015, but severely lack starter quality depth behind him. Howard should be seen as one of the most talented backs in this year's class, with a a great frame and build for the position and excellent awareness.

Yet some concerns linger about his health after missing multiple games in 2015. Some scouts are concerned about the consistency his body of work behind one of the best offensive lines in college football. The Cowboys, however, already have the best offensive line in the NFL and think he's a perfect fit especially in the fourth.

In six games in 2015, Howard average 180+ rushing yards and almost 140 yards per game total. He's another Hoosier prospect that hopes to be called in the top 100 players this spring. Howard is a talented individual that would be an excellent complement to McFadden and potential starter down the road.

Round 4 (137th): Bralon Addison, WR, Oregon, (CBS rank: 101)

Analysis: For years, the Cowboys have needed a wide receiver with some explosive speed. Speed is the name of the game at Oregon. Addison is going to have a hard time in this draft due to his size and frame but he's a willing competitor with the ability to make all the catches in the NFL.

He's built like a Brandin Cooks and there will certainly be concerns about his ability to withstand some punishment. However, receivers are widely protected across the league and Addison can get to his top-end speed almost immediately with the soft hands to make great catches. He's got excellent vision and is a big play waiting to happen. Terrance Williams and Cole Beasley have been great targets for Tony Romo but neither brings the dynamic element that Addison could.

Round 6 (192nd), Anthony Zettel, DE, Penn State, (CBS rank: 205)

Analysis: Throughout this process, you won't find a guy who is more overlooked than Zettel. They talk about the Austin Johnson's and Carl Nassib's but neglect Zettel who was second to only Joey Bosa in tackles for loss in the Big 10 with 17. Zettel has the versatility to kick inside but lacks the prototypical size. However, his relentless motor and aggressive tendencies to attack blockers will be something that catches the eye of Hot Rod. In a class with very few pass rushing ends, Zettel could be the next project for Marinelli to make. He's already got elite first step quickness, what do you say?

Round 6 (212th): Jordan Lucas, S, Penn State, (CBS rank: 210)

Analysis: I promise, I'm not a mark for the Nittany Lions. What's intriguing about Lucas was that he was a converted wide receiver and has shown some excellent ball skills for his position. He's got slick footwork and can glide across the field to mirror receivers.

Lucas is a bit of a thumper but unlike some we know, he's not going to take insane angles that leave him susceptible to be punished. He does well by keeping his eyes on the quarterback and loves himself some downhill contact. He's got the foundation to be a good safety but will certainly need work in key areas to keep improving. As far as the Cowboys are concerned, they have a lot of names, but no real depth at the position. Lucas can provide depth but also shows the traits that you look for in later rounds to build upon.

Round 6 (216th), Brandon Allen, QB, Arkansas, (CBS rank: 237)

Analysis: Here's your next Tom Brady. I'm only kidding, but Allen is still a pretty interesting prospect that has gained some respect from Bryan Broaddus. He's the Razorbacks All-Time leader in touchdown passes (64) and threw seven of those in one game.

For a year that wasn't kind to SEC quarterbacks overall, Allen was by far the brightest star at the end of the season. He vastly improved his accuracy in 2015, completing 244 of 370 passes. He's not going to wow you in any key area, but he's a competitor. His resilient attitude and never-say-die mentality is what makes him a quality passer worth consideration. He understands all of his strengths and his weakness which is imperative for a young quarterback to digest. He's shown the ability to improve with each coming year and could help the Cowboys looking for a potential young guy to develop.

Round 6 (217th): Darion Griswald, TE, Arkansas State, (CBS rank: 203)

Analysis: This is a Cowboys' pick all the way. Griswald passes the eye test of an NFL tight end with his long frame and big body. He's a converted basketball player and high school quarterback who is still learning how to use his size to his advantage. He does have some ball skill and even received honorable mention honors from his Red Wolves' coaches in the Sun Belt Conference. Like many players this late in the game, he's got traits to develop but isn't quite the sum of all his parts just yet.