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Jerry Jones discusses Ezekiel Elliott case for the first time since suspension

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We’ve heard very little from the Cowboys owner since the league suspended Ezekiel Elliott, but he opened up today.

Divisional Round - Green Bay Packers v Dallas Cowboys Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images

When the NFL suspended Ezekiel Elliott for six games, there were reports that the Cowboys and Jerry Jones were very upset by the decision behind closed doors. But, since the announcement, Jerry Jones has had very little to say on the subject. Today, he broke his silence. Elliott and his legal team are in New York today making their appeal of the ruling, so that might be some of the impetus behind Jones finally speaking about it. Todd Archer at ESPN provides a handy transcript of what Jones had to say.

"Unfortunately you get confused in this conversation," Jones said on 105.3 The Fan in Dallas on Tuesday. "Every person that has any sense at all understands domestic violence and abhors it. On the other hand, I've had a lot of experience in this area. For 10 years before I bought the Cowboys I was the head of battered women of Arkansas. I raised more money and been in more safe houses than a lot of people that talk about it and so it's a terrible problem.

"On the other hand with what we are today and what we're trying to be relative to addressing it in the league, [it] has all kinds of issues and it should. It's a very complicated issue because you have no evidence here. That's all I want to say about it. But it creates quite a convoluted approach by Zeke's representatives and by the league that I really hate is a focus of all of our attention. I do. Even though others would say that the issue needs this kind of focus and you're using the NFL for visibility."

Jones would go on to be very non-committal about what would happen next, only complimenting Elliott’s legal team and declining to say whether the Cowboys would be directly involved in any legal action should Elliott decide to pursue a remedy in the court system.

Harold Henderson will hear the case today, but there is no set time for when he has to make a decision on the suspension. As Archer notes in his article, all final briefs are due by Friday of this week, so that gives a brief indication as to the earliest we might expect any kind of decision.