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Cowboys players are feuding with the Super Bowl-bound 49ers over rights to the Hot Boyz nickname

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You know how the Dallas/San Francisco rivalry goes!

Dallas Cowboys v Washington Redskins Photo by Scott Taetsch/Getty Images

Once upon a time when the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers met it meant that there was a ticket to the Super Bowl on the line. It was serious.

This is something that Tony Casillas and I discussed on the latest episode of The 75O here at BTB, after all Tony had three sacks in the 1992 NFC Championship Game. We got into it because these days the Cowboys and 49ers are having one of those classic and elite showdowns once again.

You might be wondering how it is possible that the Cowboys could be dueling with the 49ers to any degree right now. It’s true that San Francisco will be in Miami next week in preparation of Super Bowl LIV and that the Cowboys missed the playoffs altogether. But the squabble isn’t on the field my friends, oh no, it’s in the courtroom.

The “Hot Boyzz” are causing a commotion

While 49ers players are doing media and circling around South Beach, they’ll likely be dressed in things that they like, perhaps merchandise that they even feel a sense of pride in. It’s possible that they might have shirts, hats, or something of the sort to represent a mantra that they feel a great sense of pride in - Hot Boyzz and Hot Boyzz University.

San Francisco has used this nickname as one to rally themselves in a season that has put them one win shy of a sixth Lombardi Trophy. It means so much to them that Kwon Alexander, the leader of the movement, has filed for a trademark.

Yes, I know what you’re thinking. That looks awfully familiar.

The Hot Boyz have an issue with The Hot Boyzz

You’re likely aware that players on the Dallas Cowboys defense have been using the term “Hot Boyz” to describe themselves as a nickname since training camp back in 2018. Objectively their usage of it pre-dates San Francisco’s of the same term with an extra letter.

Cowboys players have, in fact, trademarked their nickname so they’re even further ahead in this game to a degree. They’ve sold merchandise and used it as a rallying cry, but it’s the former that upset a lot of Cowboys fans. It enhanced the idea that this is a team filled with players more concerned with individual branding than overall success for the group.

Whether that’s true or not, the Hot Boyz have seemingly taken issue with San Francisco filing for a trademark and took to social media in response of it to air our their opinions.

The emoji that both Jaylon Smith and Antwaun Woods used is the one that represents the Hot Boyz, they all use it frequently when they post things on social media about the group. Again, this is their thing and has been for some time.

If you don’t know where this all started it began with a player that has spent his own time in Miami - Taco Charlton. Before ending up with the Dolphins, it was Charlton that coined the term as a member of the Cowboys. He also took issue with Alexander filing a trademark.

Again, the facts here (facts being that Lawrence has a trademark) show that the Cowboys (as in their players) seem to have been in on this before the 49ers (again, their players, not the two organizations as a whole).

The thing is, though, there are Cowboys fans who were rubbed the wrong way by the entire Hot Boyz movement. It corroborated, and this issue does as well, the idea that they were a group more focused on individual growth than team success. That is a gigantic assumption and there’s no way to prove such a claim, but the optics of this don’t look great for the Cowboys players involved.

The San Francisco 49ers are about to play in the Super Bowl. The reality of that is that when you have success like that, you can do whatever you want because you’re winning. For the Cowboys to be arguing over a small detail like this with the NFC Champions is, well, it is what it is.