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Cowboys news: CBA may not affect Cowboys plans this offseason

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Washington Redskins v Dallas Cowboys Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Tag deadline changed, Cowboys may still get to use both franchise, transition - Matthew Lenix, Cowboys Wire

Could a delay in the new CBA actually help the Cowboys?

With free agency rapidly approaching, the Dallas Cowboys will have plenty of decisions to make regarding their roster for 2020. They have 25 unrestricted free agents, which will indeed cause for plenty of turnover from 2019.

The two most important free agents for the Cowboys, Dak Prescott, and Amari Cooper, are both seeking long-term deals with the organization. Saturday evening, however, some important news broke that affects these two players specifically. The Cowboys have an additional 48 hours to decide what to do with either Prescott or Cooper or both if long-term deals aren’t reached.

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the NFL and NFLPA have delayed the designation date to apply the franchise tag from February 25 to February 27, and the end date from March 10 to March 12.


If Amari Leaves Dallas, Cowboys Should Target Robby Anderson - Mauricio Rodriguez, Inside the Star

Could Robby Anderson be the answer for an Amari-less Cowboys?

Anderson hasn’t played in a high-caliber offense and he might be a good supporting cast away from becoming one of the league’s finest at his position.

In 2017, he racked up 941 yards and seven touchdowns. Over the past two seasons, he’s caught 102 passes for1,531 yards and 11 touchdowns. Plus, he will be one of the younger free agents at the position with only 26 years of age.

According to Spotrac, the calculated market value for Anderson is around $12M per year. That doesn’t sound bad if Cooper is looking for over $20M annually.

Wherever he ends up in, Robby Anderson will shine as the talented WR that he is. If the Cowboys can’t keep Amari Cooper around, I hope the front office targets Anderson.


Dallas Cowboys predicted to land Pro Bowl defensive tackle in free agency - Steven Mullenax, The Landry Hat

Defensive tackles? Yes please.

With a new head coach and revamped coaching staff in place, the Cowboys figure to be making big changes across their roster. That likely includes upgrading the defensive tackle position. And one football analytics website believes Dallas should have their eyes set on 31-year old Pro Bowl defensive tackle Mike Daniels, who is scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent next month.

Here’s what Anthony Treash of Pro Football Focus wrote about his prediction that the Cowboys sign Daniels to a two-year, $10 million deal this offseason.

Mike Daniels’ peak years seem to be over. These past couple offseasons, he wasn’t able to sniff his three-year stretch from 2015-17 when he produced PFF overall grades of 90.3, 77.3 and 81.5. That being said, he’s still capable of being an average to slightly above average interior defensive lineman.”

Drafted in the fourth round of the 2012 NFL Draft out of Iowa by the Green Bay Packers, the connection between Daniels and the Cowboys is clear. Former Packers head coach Mike McCarthy is now at the helm of America’s Team and could certainly look for players he’s familiar with to help him take Dallas back to the postseason.


Cowboys free agency focus: If Dallas can’t keep Robert Quinn, Vic Beasley is risk worth a look - Michael Sisemore, Blogging the Boys

Is Vic Beasley worth a look if the Cowboys can’t re-sign Robert Quinn?

The Cowboys long list of unrestricted free agents includes their 2019 sack leader, Robert Quinn. He was one of the brightest stars during a lost season for the Cowboys. Robert Quinn’s 11.5 sacks last season has upped his market value anywhere between $12-$14 million annually. The Cowboys are flush with cash, with nearly $80 million in cap space. That number can climb higher with a few flicks of a pen as well. However, once the Cowboys sign Prescott and Cooper, that money will become a lot tighter.

It would be awful to lose Robert Quinn just when DeMarcus Lawrence finally got some help but it’s the reality of the NFL. If Dallas did lose out on Robert Quinn, they would be much smarter to go shopping for proven production than hoping to strike big in the NFL Draft. We all are aware of how cruel the NFL can be to rookie edge rushers. That’s why the Cowboys need to do some homework on Falcons edge rusher Vic Beasley.

VIC BEASLEY, FALCONS

Beasley was drafted eighth overall in the 2015 NFL Draft by the Falcons. He came out of Clemson a two-time Consensus All-American, two-time All-ACC First Team selection, and 2014’s ACC Defensive Player of the Year. Like many rookie edge rushers, Beasley didn’t set the league on fire but he did give brief flashes of the amazing athlete he can be. In Beasley’s second NFL season, he soared to the top of the league. In 12 starts, Beasley had 39 tackles, 15.5 sacks, six forced fumbles, and a defensive touchdown. The Falcons wound up blowing it in the Super Bowl but Beasley was a First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selection. His 15.5 sacks led the league.


Cowboys position preview: Despite ‘down’ year for Ezekiel Elliott, running back could be Dallas’ strongest position - David Moore, DMN

Looking for a strength for the Cowboys? Look no further than running back.

An argument can be made that this is the team’s strongest position. Pollard’s role will probably grow, but the trick is for the Cowboys to find a way to do so without cutting into Elliott’s effectiveness.

There’s also some question about how much McCarthy will rely on the running game given the tendencies he displayed while in Green Bay. That’s a legitimate question. Here’s the answer:

He never had a back as good as Elliott during his time with the Packers.

Elliott won’t disappear from this offense. Expect him to have a slight resurgence in ’20 while Pollard’s impact continues to increase.


Spagnola: Staking Out List Of Priority Needs - Mickey Spagnola, The Mothership

Some offseson priorities for the Cowboys.

No. 4 in my books is defensive end, since Robert Quinn, last year’s sack leader with 11.5, also is an unrestricted free agent. Take into account, too, that Quinn is turning 30 in May, and had played on a one-year, prove-it deal this past season for what amounted to $7.9 million. This could be his final contract, and guarantee you he’ll be looking for a contractual home run. So he won’t come cheap if Dallas is intent on re-signing him. If not, not sure the Cowboys have a ready replacement on the right side on the current roster. Dorance Armstrong? Joe Jackson? Sign another veteran free agent? Draft? This must be a high priority. Although, looks as if versatile D-Lineman Tyrone Crawford will recover in time from dual hip surgeries to afford some help. But even that costs ($8 million base).

No. 5 is defensive tackle, especially with 3-technique starter Maliek Collins an unrestricted free agent. Can they get him re-signed? Because other than 1-technique tackle Antwaun Woods (exclusive rights free agent) and the possibility of Crawford helping out inside, too, backups like Christian Covington, Michael Bennett and Kerry Hyder also are unrestricted free agents. Lots of work to do here. Lots of help needed.

No. 6, and if you are getting the feeling my thoughts are defensive heavy, you’re darn right. And now even heavier – safety. Starter Jeff Heath, special teamer Kavon Frazier and backup Darian Thompson all are unrestricted free agents. Plus, Heath will be coming off shoulder surgery, so far repairing just one of the two injured ones he played through for the majority of the season. Now, I’m seeing all these early mocks have the Cowboys drafting a safety in the first round. Sounds good, right? But really? With all these other worries hovering overhead? But wouldn’t you rather have a pass-rushing defensive end or a slot receiver or a mobile, big-body defensive tackle or cornerback than a box safety? Priorities, please.