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Cowboys fullback competition could make for an interesting training camp battle

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Who will be the Cowboys fullback in 2020?

Green Bay Packers v Dallas Cowboys Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

With a new coaching staff, comes new opportunities. Jamize Olawale has been with the Cowboys the last couple of seasons, and has been quiet, but effective in his time in Dallas. Olawale received a contract extension in 2019, signing a three-year, $5.4 million contract with the Dallas Cowboys, including a $1.8 million signing bonus, $2.8 million guaranteed, and an average annual salary of $1.8 million, per Spotrac.com.

It’s important to remember that Olawale signed that extension when Jason Garrett was the head coach. Since then, a whole new coaching staff is in Dallas and if their undrafted free agent class is any indication of future plans, the Cowboys may want to go younger, cheaper, and more versatile at the fullback position in 2020 and the future.

The Cowboys added two UDFA fullback/H-back style players after the 2020 NFL Draft, and both players have very good shots at pushing Olawale for the starting fullback spot. TCU RB/FB Sewo Olonilua is the most intriguing name on this list because of what he did as a runner in college. Olonilua was a big, power runner at TCU, and had success as a pass-blocker, and pass catcher. Listed at 6’3”, 232-lbs, the transition to fullback should be rather easy for the former TCU running back. Olonulia would bring an instant upgrade as a pass catcher from the fullback position, and can can serve as the teams RB3 on the depth chart as well. While Olonulia is well-rounded coming into camp, he will need to prove himself as a run-blocker consistently before he’ll be viewed as a real replacement for Olawale.

Another guy that was added after the 2020 draft is Portland State TE/H-Back Charlie Taumoepeau. Like Olonulia, Taumoepeau would also be making a small-position switch. Taumoepeau was mainly used as a tight end at Portland State, but projects more as a H-back in the NFL. Taumoepeau doesn’t the size to be an every down tight end at the next level, but his receiving skills, and willingness as a blocker would allow to him shine as a pass catcher and move-blocker in the running game. Like Olonilua, Taumoepeau has plenty of things he’ll need to prove in training camp before he’ll get a legit shot at Olawale’s job, but don’t be surprised when you see him taking reps at fullback and excelling as a receiver out of the backfield with the second and third teams.

As the salary cap tightens with top of the roster players getting signed, cutting costs anyway you can is a smart way to go about doing business, especially at positions that don’t make a massive impact on game days. While Olawale isn’t necessarily a a bad player, the Cowboys could save a few million dollars, while also getting younger at the position.