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Dak Prescott’s brother says it’s time for the Cowboys to give the quarterback his money

Dak Prescott’s brother had a blatant message for Cowboys management after the Goff/Stafford deal.

New York Giants v Dallas Cowboys Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Saturday’s Jared Goff/Matthew Stafford swap between the Los Angeles Rams and Detroit Lions set off a firestorm of speculative questions surrounding the league’s most pertinent position – the quarterback.

Production discrepancies (Jared Goff’s been to a Super Bowl; Matt Stafford hasn’t) between the two men aside, their comparative timelines have been strikingly similar. They were both first-round draft selections in their respective draft classes, and were primed to be the directive forces behind a franchise turnaround upon arrival. They’ve both posted gaudy seasonal displays, and have been the igniting throttles behind powerful offensive showcases. And both have cashed in on enormous paydays due to their undeniable importance to their teams.

Stafford’s lump sum was gargantuan: $135 M over five years, plus a massive $50 M total just for signing his name on the dotted line.

Goff, meanwhile, shattered records with his contract: $134 M for one year less than his QB counterpart.

Ironically, it was the lesser paid player of the two – and the older one at that – who warranted the heftier trade package in the exchange. Stafford commanded two first-round draft picks and a third in addition to his own services in the Goff deal, which speaks volumes about the Rams’ faith in him at 32 years of age.

It also beckons innumerable questions about some of the league’s other top-notch passers, and what their worth should be on the open market. One name who’s been a recent fixture in the ever-revolving trade carousel is Deshaun Watson, and the heap of assets amassed by Detroit for Stafford has forced fans and analysts to closely examine what Watson’s monetary value is should teams come calling.

He’s is undoubtedly one of the hottest patrons on the block, headlining a slew of potential QB targets that teams will salivate over as free agency draws nearer.

The other name who may rival Watson’s in conversational frequency on the negotiation rumor-mill belongs to the person who is currently the closest starting headman to him in terms of relative location, Dak Prescott. The dialogue surrounding this Texas signal-caller centers strictly around free agency and the specific amount that #4’s talents should requisite from Jerry Jones.

It’s been a talking point for years now in what’s endured as a lingering back-and-forth scuffle between dissenting sides. Prescott wants more money (and fewer years), and Jones wants to extricate as many dollars as he can to bulwark his own pockets (and lock Prescott up for as long a possible). And right now, business discussions remain frozen in deadlock, but that doesn’t mean the people have ceased their own discourses.

In fact, a longtime familiar voice of prominence dropped his own gasoline into the unextinguished fire after seeing the boisterous Stafford deal unfold. None other than Dak’s brother, Tad.

Tad Prescott took to Twitter to voice his own resignations about Dallas’ handling of his brother’s contract situation, reposting about an Instagram picture about the 2016 QB class with the caption: “So the guy who was never supposed to make it, is now the last one standing. Let that sink in.”

He then went to retweet a timely evaluation from DallasCowboys.com’s David Helman on the current whereabouts of his brother’s fellow classmates:

“Bish better have my $$.”

Well, we know where Tad stands in the “should Dak get paid” conversation. And at this point, Dak’s support troupe has far more participants than his contending one. Most think the Cowboys should be backing up the Brinks truck to his front door sometime in the very near future.

As far as Dak is concerned, he’s been relatively quiet as he rehabs himself back into full health. But when he does speak, you can bet your bottom dollar that his message will be short, sweet and to the point.

And it will mirror a singular line spoken in Jerry Maguire that would become one of the most famous sports movie quotes of all time: “show me the money.”