FanPost

DQD - 10

Below are an amateur’s observations on the Dan Quin Defense as seen in week 10 game: Dallas 28, Green Bay 31.

Overall, it wasn’t the best showing for the DQD, with the team giving up 31 points to a team that had lost 5 in a row prior to the Cowboy game. When Green Bay asked the Cowboys whether they preferred the slow death of a running game or a quick death by passing the team answered "yes." Not only did the defense give up 207 yards rushing, it gave up another 224 passing, including several long, quick scores.

Generally speaking, the DQ Defense is built around stopping the pass. In this game I couldn’t find an instance of having more than 6 total defensive linemen/linebackers on the field at the same time. In other words, they had 5 or more defensive backs on the field for every defensive play.

The chart below shows that DQ favors having 4 players on the defensive line and having 1 safety deep most of the time. During this game, just over half the time that there were 5 or more on the line the team sent 5 or more players after the quarterback. Just under half the time, one or two linebackers would back out, adding a little bit of uncertainty as to the defensive call.

On the line

%

3

0

4

80

5 +

20

One Deep

83

Two Deep

17

Blitz

23

The blitz percentage was ~ 10 % higher than typical for the team. It’s effectiveness, however, was below the normal standard.

Blitz Effectiveness

Result

Number

Sack/Fumble

1

Incomplete / no gain

7

TD

2

10+ yard gain

3

1 - 10 yard

2

So, you can see that 8 out of the 15 blitzes were effective, resulting in either a sack (in this case with a fumble as well) or no gain. However, 2 touchdowns were on blitzes, and an additional 3 plays of over 10 yards were given up.

For the first 3 series the blitzes were effective with no negative results. After that, however, their effectiveness diminished. What was surprising was that the frequency of blitzing remained relatively constant throughout the game, even though it was the run that seemed to be causing the most problems (more on that later).

Since Anthony Barr was out of the game due to injury, most of his linebacker reps were taken by Micah Parsons. In a dramatic change from the previous weeks, Micah was lined up on the line of scrimmage for only 15% of the plays. Damone Clark played a meager 11% of the snaps, subbing for either Micah or Vander Esch.

Playing time for Linemen/Linebackers

Name

Position

Weight

Snaps

lbs

%

Lawrence

DE

265

72

Williams

DE

261

27

Fowler

DE

261

31

Armstrong

DE

255

50

Vander Esch

LB

256

95

Barr

LB

255

0

Parsons

LB

245

95

Clark

LB

240

11









Watkins

DT

305

25

Odighizuwa

DT

280

59

Bohanna

DT

360

36

Gallimore

DT

302

39

Hankins

DT

340

39

One of the defensive weaknesses of the last few weeks has been the inability to consistently slow down or stop the run. I am not sure the root cause of this, but it doesn’t seem like the size of the defensive linemen is the problem. Four of the five defensive tackles that played significant snaps are over 300 lbs. and the lightweight of the group is 280. The rotation looks good—the tackles get quite a bit more "time off" than the defensive tackles on most teams. Yet 40% of the runs were up the middle, with 34% going to the right and 26% going to the left. During this game, Bohanna and Gallimore were the most effective of the tackles with 6 tackles apiece. Next was Osa with 3.

Green Bay opened the game with seven straight running plays, and every one gained 4 – 8 yards. It was a very impressive show of power and execution. Whatever adjustments that were incorporated during the bye week were not particularly effective.

One of themes of the games was that the pass rush was not nearly as effective as normal. Green Bay had very good execution from their offensive line and very good anticipation of the Dallas blitzes. As an example, on the last GB touchdown, the Packers were in a max protection scheme with only 2 receivers in the pattern, thus negating the Dallas blitz. A review of the big plays (see table below) shows the lack of effectiveness.

Gain

Direction

Reason

Yards

(offensive perspective)

17

Run right

Didn't maintain edge

58T

Pass (blitz)

Safety chose wrong receiver

12T

Run middle

Line stunt left huge hole

11

Pass

Back left open by LB

23

Pass

CB never looked for ball

15

Pass (blitz)

Blitz picked up well

39T

Pass

Too much time for QB

17

Run middle

Dble team overpowered line/missed tackles

23

Run right

Over pursuit to left

7T

Pass (blitz)

Blitz picked up well

36

Pass (blitz)

DB fell down

Please keep in mind that I am an amateur; thus, the observations above may be overly simplistic. Nonetheless, it does appear that Green Bay did a great job negating the Cowboy’s pass rush. Rogers, though sacked twice, was rarely pressured, giving him plenty of time to dissect the defense. Was this due to Parsons playing mostly off the ball? I would guess this is certainly a factor. He was still tied (with Lawrence and Wilson) for the team lead in tackles with 12, but he didn’t pressure the QB with his normal effectiveness. Next week I anticipate him playing considerably more on the line as the DQD tries to force the Minnesota QB into a few mistakes.




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